logo

sponsor: Qi Journal

 

rule

 

Navigation:

 

 

Portals

 

  • Home
  • Qi
  • Creative Arts
  • Feng Shui
  • Martial Arts
  • Qigong
  • Scientific Studies
  • Spirituality
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Acupuncture

    Herbals

    Concept of Qi in TCM

     

     

    rule

     

    Article Index

     

    rule

     

    Author List




     Found 32 articles.



    Articles:

    1. Gods Living In The Body? by Professor Jerry Alan Johnson. As my teacher began to explain the deeper “secret” teachings of the Daoist Internal Neigong System, I suddenly found myself in a state of deep internal conflict over something that he had said.

    2. Improve Your Brain With Qi by Shui Yin Lo, PhD. Can qi improve your brain? Can qi help you to slow down this part of the aging process? Can qi help you retain your memory?

    3. Qi in Qigong: The Theory by Various Sources. This entry was taken from sections of the article "Qigong" in the May 31, 2011 edition of Wikipedia.com

    4. Qi in Traditional Chinese Medicine by Marty Eisen, Ph.D. In Traditional Chinese Medicine the concept of Qi is used primarily in two ways. The first is to describe the activities of bodily organ. The second use of Qi is to describe vital energy.

    5. Qi in Traditional Chinese Thought by Marty Eisen, Ph.D. Before beginning any modern scientific investigation of Qi, the concept of Qi and its properties in Chinese philosophy must be known.

    6. Qi in Tuina by John Voigt. Tuina literally means "push" and "grab." It is a style of Chinese massage that in addition to working on the muscles and other soft tissues, and joints of the body, also improves and harmonizes the flow of qi.

    7. Qi Is Not A Mysterious Force by Franklin Fick. There is endless discussion about what Qi is. If you research on the internet you can become very confused, because it seems no two people will ever agree. The reality is that understanding Qi is not difficult.

    8. Qigong Deviation by Various Sources. Negative somatic or mental reactions in the course of practicing Qigong.

    9. The Beijing Qi Healing Abduction by Various Sources. This entry explores a famous example of external qi used for healing, but as supervised by extraterrestrials on a UFO. The ETs offered their explanations of what this curative qi is and how it works.

    10. The Concept of Qi by Alex Holland, M.Ac., L. Ac.. The art of TCM lies not only in the skill involved in practicing it, but also through the interpretation of the symbolism of the language.

    11. The Concept of Qi in Acupuncture Core Therapy: Visible Qi—Invisible Qi by Shoji Kobayashi. Visible qi can be seen and is apparent to the senses. Invisible qi moves with no clear cause and effect and its perception is subjective.

    12. The History and Concept of Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 1 and 2 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM

    13. The Implications of the Scientific Theories of New Physics by Professor Man Fong Mei. Scientific knowledge based on the old world view of Newtonian physics has now been replaced by the 'New Physics' developed from Einstein's Relativity Theory and Max Planck's Quantum Mechanics.

    14. The Qi of Life by Denise Thunderhawk, L.Ac. We make Qi by combining food (Grain Qi / Gu Qi) and air (Clear Qi / Qing Qi).

    15. Turbid Qi by Professor Jerry Alan Johnson. Turbid Qi is also called "Evil Qi" or "Pathogenic Qi," and refers to any murky energy which can originate either from within or from outside of the body's organ system.

    16. Understanding the Concept of Qi by Professor Jerry Alan Johnson. More than 5000 years ago, the ancient Chinese masters of esoteric healing came to the understanding that everything is composed of the same energetic substance, which they called “Qi”

    17. Understanding Yin, Yang and Qi by Alan Keith Tillotson, LAc. (Licensed Acupuncturist, Delaware), and Registered Herbalist. The triad of Yin, Yang and Qi (pronounced chee) serves as the basis for the medical theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

    18. Unveiling the "Message" by Professor Jerry Allan Johnson. The Five Levels of Energetic Expression

    19. What is Acupuncture? by Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP. The ancient Chinese believed that there is a universal life energy called Qi that circulates throughout the body along specific pathways called meridians.

    20. What is Qi and How To See It—Acupuncture by Shui Yin Lo, PhD. We cannot see the propagation of qi with our eyes, but when qi reaches the problem area, we can use infrared image techniques to see its effect.

    21. What is Qi? by Emma Suttie, D.Ac, AP. To the Chinese, it is a given. It is the very force that governs life and all of its processes, but for us in the West, it is a little more difficult to wrap our minds around.

    22. What Is Qi? (and Other Concepts) by Christopher Hafner. After 2,500 years of evolution, TCM has become a very rich and sophisticated system of rational medicine with a great diversity of theories and applications.

    23. The Formation of Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 3 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    24. The Functions of Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 4 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    25. The Movement of Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 5 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    26. The Classification of Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 6 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    27. Modern investigations on Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 7 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    28. The Significance of Studying Qi by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 8 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    29. The Comparisons between Qi and Bioenergy by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 9 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    30. The Effects of QIHM and QRHM on Energy Metabolism—An experimental perspective by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 10 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    31. Conclusion to "Approach to the Nature of Qi in TCM - Qi and Bioenergy" by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 11 of a 12 part article on the Nature of Qi in TCM.

    32. References for "An Approach to the Nature of Qi" by Xing-Tai Li and Jia Zhao. Part 12. Extensive bibliographic citations for the referenced sources used in "An Approach to the Nature of Qi."

      Related: Qi  |   article  |  

     

    Copyright Info  |  Medical Disclaimer